Stories — Design

Emeco 1006 Navy Chair

Posted by Remo Giuffré on

Emeco 1006 Navy Chair

Hand Made in 77 Steps. Built to Last. 

You’ve likely seen versions or depictions of this iconic chair on many occasions, and in a variety of places: homes, offices, restaurants, hotels; maybe even prisons and submarines. The chair features regularly in design magazines and movies, such as The Matrix, The Dark Knight, Law & Order and CSI.

It’s called the 1006 (pronounced ten-oh-six) “Navy” chair, and it’s made in Hanover, Pennsylvania, by Emeco, a company that was created in 1944 just to make that specific chair. The back story is a good one.

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Swiss Railway Clock

Posted by Remo Giuffré on

Swiss Railway Clock

Design Classic with Unique Movement

The official Swiss railway clock, also known as the "SBB clock," is a clock design that was created for use in railway stations in Switzerland by the Swiss Federal Railways (SBB) in 1944. The clock has become a cultural icon in Switzerland and is considered a global design classic. The movement of its hands is unique.

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QR Codes

Posted by Remo Giuffré on

QR Codes

What do they remind you off?

There’s a reason why QR codes might remind you of something else.

"I used to play Go [the Japanese game involving black and white stones played on a 19x19 grid] on my lunch break. One day, while arranging the black and white pieces on the grid, it hit me that it represented a straightforward way of conveying information. It was a eureka moment."
  ~ Masahiro Hara on Nippon.com, 10 February 2020

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Dagen H

Posted by Remo Giuffré on

Dagen H

The most massive overhaul in driving infrastructure the world has ever seen

“Dagen H” (H Day) happened on 3 September 1967, the day that Sweden switched from driving on the left hand side of the road to the right. The "H" stands for "Högertrafik", the Swedish word for right hand traffic. It was by far the largest logistical event in Sweden's history, and the most massive overhaul in driving infrastructure that the world had ever seen.

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Möbius Strip

Posted by Remo Giuffré on

Möbius Strip

Single Continuous Surface

What do the Google Drive logo, old fashioned conveyor belts, and Gabriel Garcìa Màrquez’s novel One Hundred Years of Solitude all have in common? They each pay homage to the Möbius Strip, a single-sided, non-orientable surface.  

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